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  • Jordan Wyatt  On 7 July 2010 at 7:29 pm

    Hi Dave,

    Great to hear another NZer mentioned, and by Cringely himself! A recent Cranky Geeks (with John C Dvorak) had a shout out to NZ 🙂

    As someone DESPERATE to import an iPhone 4, I enjoy reading all I can about these “antenna issues”.

    Do you think they will manifest badly in New Zealand? I have an unlocked Original iPhone, I rarely make calls or send texts, but obviously…having a phone that can make PHONE CALLS is important for emergencies!

    I managed to get an iPad a month or so ago, but this wait for the iPhone 4 is just as tragic! I’m going to try and pressure an English friend into sending me one soon!

    Thank you for your research and opinion Dave.

    Jordan Wyatt
    Invercargill
    http://coexistingwithnonhumananimals.blogspot.com/

    • Dave  On 12 July 2010 at 8:50 am

      Off the cuff, I’d say yes, all iPhone 4’s will have the same problem until Apple changes something. But it does seem that only American’s (AT&T users) are experiencing the problem, and then not all users.

      The obvious reason would be that AT&T’s network is lousy. The problem only shows up (we expect) when the signal is weak. By analogy, NZ Telecom users would have more of a problem than those on “the other network”.

      My suspicion is that spectrum (frequency) allocation also has something to do with it. To understand that properly I’d have to do a frequency analysis. I’ll see if the motivation arises!

  • K7AAY  On 12 July 2010 at 7:16 am

    What, pray tell, is a ‘wit’ and how is it calculated?

    • Dave  On 12 July 2010 at 9:00 am

      A wit is a measure of signal strength in dB relative to the minimum signal level required to maintain the connection. Taking that level as nominally -113 dBm, then:

      signal level (wits) = signal level (dBm) + 113

      Using wits moves the scale of signal strength so that it reads like a speedometer, from zero to 60 (say), instead of from -113 to -53.

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